Tag Archives: Falls Lake

Brief Update: Black Vultures Nesting at the B. W. Wells S.R.A.

Each winter for the past five years, a pair of Black Vultures have nested in a hollow tree at the B. W. Wells S.R.A., at Falls Lake, North Carolina.  It is presumably the same pair each time, as Black Vultures are … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Fall Wildflowers on the Road to Rockcliff Farm

Rockcliff Farm is located over a mile and a half from the entrance to the B.W. Wells State Recreation Area at Falls Lake, North Carolina.  Much of the area along the road to the farm is heavily wooded, but large open areas, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Japanese Pagoda Tree and the Giant Resin Bee – Asian Species Reunited in North America

The Japanese Pagoda Tree (Styphnolobium japonicum) is an ornamental tree introduced from Asia, and  best known for its showy bloom in late summer, long after the flowering period for most trees.  A beautiful specimen can be found at Falls Lake, in … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Common Water-primrose (Ludwigia grandiflora ssp. hexapetala) Engulfs Parts of Falls Lake, N.C.

Below is an inlet of Falls Lake located in Eastern Durham County.  Viewed from a car driving along a  quiet country road, the inlet looks like a lush pasture with a small pond at the end.  But the “crop” being … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Valley Redstem (Ammania coccinea) at Falls Lake, North Carolina

Annual and seasonal fluctuations in Falls Lake water levels often lead to dramatic swings in the population size of many shoreline plants, particularly the annuals.  At times, sustained droughts can create large mud flats in the shallow inlets of the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Distinguishing North Carolina’s Wild Barberries

The major Barberry species in North Carolina have many similarities, but their backgrounds are very different.  One (American Barberry)  is an important and rare native plant, with state protected status.  The other three (European, Wintergreen and Japanese Barberry) are introduced species which … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Visit From Mazus pumilus

Mazus pumilus (Japanese Mazus) looks like a cultivated plant that just crawled out of a neighborhood garden.  But in fact it is an introduced species that has become naturalized throughout the eastern United States.  Originating in East Asia, Mazus pumilus … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment